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Christy Kinard

The work of Atlanta artist Christy Kinard is an expression of her soul, selflessly sharing her unique vision in spirited works that evoke a refreshingly youthful sense of hope, happiness, and joy. Christy Kinard has enjoyed a life-long success both as a nationally acclaimed artist and household favorite. Kinard showed her first pieces by age 18, and has been celebrated in major publications. She has continued to be popular with collectors across the United States and Europe.

Jill Ricci

One of the most arresting visuals for me is an old wall layered with papers, graffiti and text- our modern hieroglyphics. I try to re-create this beauty in my work, the layers of time and decay are what interest me. I hope that the person viewing my work will linger, trying to discover hidden imagery and text and depending on their life experience, find their own meaning or interpretation. Found images and objects function as signifiers of both individual and collective experience. By incorporating materials that are linked to the realities of daily life, I strive to establish an immediate identification between the viewer and the work of art. I am exploring the place between “high art” and popular culture, text and image, figuration and abstraction, past and present , and two and three-dimensional space. I begin working without a final vision in mind: I use collected materials and allow pattern, texture, color and structure to emerge organically

Johnny Taylor

Based on the ephemera of modern urban life, my paintings explore the things we look at each day without seeing. Though everything is game imagery-wise, I am drawn to advertising images and glyphs, the visual shorthand of contemporary culture. As a painter, I have as an objective to explore the subtexts and uncover the possibilities of seemingly innocuous marketing imagery. The chief ambition of art, I believe, is to change the way we look at the world around us. Bright colored blocks compose my acrylic paintings. I enjoy the look and feel of loose, graffiti-like marks, text, and “noise” against these vividly hued planes. Usually I paint with layers, with each new layer showing a bit of the one beneath, either by transparency, an unpainted “window” area, or by a scraping away of recent layers. Often this process yields unexpected colors and forms. Similarly, I use corrugated cardboard, bubble wrap or other common materials to apply paint in tightly striped registers, creating texture, space, and still more unintended forms. Played against this pictorial depth are images that are hard edged and, at times, almost aggressively flat. A vibrant tension is produced by the interplay between these forthright, graphic forms and the painterly, almost old world concern for surface qualities