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Jylian Gustlin

Figures have always been an important part of Gustlin’s repertoire. Her characters are frequently set in an alien-like landscape, moody and brooding, yet at the same time, depicting a sense of future. Jylian has been influenced by a lifelong love of the Bay Area Figurative artists. For the last several years, Jylian has been working on a series of paintings, both abstract and representational, that are based on the Fibonacci mathematical theories.

Amy Maas

The new series is called "Soundtracks." Painting to music has always been integral to my work. I need the music to clear my mind - to make room for my thoughts and emotions to express themselves. By combining my two great loves of music and painting, I am able to concentrate and lose myself in the moment. I decided to paint to music I listen to this time, instead of using it as background. Therefore each painting is a direct result of an actual soundtrack I listened to while painting.

Johnny Taylor

Based on the ephemera of modern urban life, my paintings explore the things we look at each day without seeing. Though everything is game imagery-wise, I am drawn to advertising images and glyphs, the visual shorthand of contemporary culture. As a painter, I have as an objective to explore the subtexts and uncover the possibilities of seemingly innocuous marketing imagery. The chief ambition of art, I believe, is to change the way we look at the world around us. Bright colored blocks compose my acrylic paintings. I enjoy the look and feel of loose, graffiti-like marks, text, and “noise” against these vividly hued planes. Usually I paint with layers, with each new layer showing a bit of the one beneath, either by transparency, an unpainted “window” area, or by a scraping away of recent layers. Often this process yields unexpected colors and forms. Similarly, I use corrugated cardboard, bubble wrap or other common materials to apply paint in tightly striped registers, creating texture, space, and still more unintended forms. Played against this pictorial depth are images that are hard edged and, at times, almost aggressively flat. A vibrant tension is produced by the interplay between these forthright, graphic forms and the painterly, almost old world concern for surface qualities