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Alicia Lachance

I am inspired by ancient, worn temple walls and the virtue of, Japanese print maker, Utamaro's design fluency. I am equally inspired by minimal purities of the power of color, color's reaction to other color, and pure mark-making. Mark-making represents to me a record of time and activity while exposing the artistic process and its vulnerabilities. The spontaneous scraping and layering in these works impart energy and capriciousness atop a weathered undertone. My work intends to create a story of continuity between the past and present by collaging small bits of, what I consider contemporary graphic symbolism with nature references. This lexicon is meant to bridge the healthy, tangibility of nature with a certain positivity regarding our modernity. Ultimately, I hope these paintings resonate with a broad spectrum of people, engaging the viewer in present time with a modern beauty created through worn surfaces and contemporary imagery.

Wendeline Simpson Matson

I paint everyday. I do studies. I paint walls. My studio is canvas, wood, tools and paint. It is my laboratory. It is a place for me to paint fresh and allow my inspiration to flow. I bring ideas here. Ideas for my paintings evolve from the experiences I have, colors that inspire me, and the objects that surround me everyday. I take these and put them together as a still life. The still life setting is my outlet. As a still life painter, I abstract elements in each painting allowing other qualities to take on a stronger role. I combine these abstracted forms with realistic and expressionistic views of objects, shapes and color. Part of my inspiration is pushing the boundaries of what can be done from a two-dimensional perspective. I need objects to exist figuratively to the extent that they define the space of a setting. I am fascinated with this space and the way that it can hold objects together or pull them apart. It is with color and texture I shape the focus of a painting and frame the essence of a still life setting with the feeling of a place.

Allen Wynn

Allen Wynn's tough, graceful sculptures represent the inner beings of working people that he has known throughout his life. They are usually women, sometimes accompanied by a child whose role is that of a clear-eyed observer. Occasionally he will add a bird or a fish, not as an overt symbol but as a simple evocation of rural existence. The figures are reserved yet accessible. Suzanne Deats, Santa Fe arts writer Often mistake for bronze sculptures, Allen Wynn has developed a unique process which incorporates wooden frameworks, paper pulp from natural and recycled materials mixed with sawdust, resin, and sand from the nearby Red River. He applies thin layers of this substance to the armature, adding and subtracting and modeling until the contours and the texture are right. In the final step, Allen applies multiple coats of paints as well as resin to give each piece a unique patina and as well as a protective seal.