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Sherri Belassen

SHERRI BELASSEN uses shapes and colors in a contemporary manner to create her unique artwork. Her work often portrays animals and figures in earth tones resonant with her Arizona home. She was born and raised in Indianapolis and attended the University of Missouri on a full track and field scholarship while majoring in fine arts. Her dreams of making the Olympics were derailed by a sports injury. She then channeled her energies fully into art, graduating form Indiana University with a Bachelor of Fine Arts. She credits her inspiration in design and composition to trips she took as a child with her father in his two-seater airplane. The patterns and colors of the landscape informed her later aesthetic, which is built around defined blocks of color. “In life and art, I try to stay true to myself and listen to my own voice.”

Sabre Esler

Sabre is currently experimenting with subject matter that has an emotional quality. Some pieces have a relaxed and joyful appeal while others evoke a more complex and personal response. Overall, the artist would like to relay the joy of living and the calming affect of the environments she paints. Sabre's work has an atmospheric quality that results from the colors and textures that she builds up. She admires the spirit of the expressionist masters and seeks to create work that evokes an emotional impact. Her subjects include abstract landscapes and interior-scapes, as well as figurative imagery.

Craig Mooney

Craig Mooney’s paintings translate the emotional impact of a places that he has visited. His imagery feels familiar but is not specific. The sky, most notable for the weather, is a dominant force in most of his works. In Vermont, his current home, Craig witnesses drastic shifts in weather in a single day that results in storms to sun and back again. The shifts of lights across the surface of valleys are captured beautifully in his landscapes. In addition to expressive landscapes, Craig also creates elegant figurative paintings that allow the viewer to observe someone deep private thoughts.

Elise Morris

The shapes of nature are so much more surprising than what I imagine them to be. And so, I start with something tangible. In drawing the curves and winding trails of a branch in bloom, I have learned that beauty is in the unexpected and momentary. I consider the fleeting images that represent change: a sequin of light, a passing shadow, tangles of blurred lines, the places where growth blooms and withers along an otherwise bare branch. I am interested in exploring nature’s point of view - how nature might perceive itself on the inside. From this perspective, I imagine a chaotic tumble of change and growth, a relentless and overwhelming surge of interconnected events. Painting takes the form of inquiry where my process is made visible. I want to hold a moment in my focus, noticing the fragility of its current state before it quickly becomes something completely different. In this way, I am watchful of my surroundings. There is beauty in unexpected places, not just waiting to be found, but waiting to really be seen.