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Sabre Esler

Sabre is currently experimenting with subject matter that has an emotional quality. Some pieces have a relaxed and joyful appeal while others evoke a more complex and personal response. Overall, the artist would like to relay the joy of living and the calming affect of the environments she paints. Sabre's work has an atmospheric quality that results from the colors and textures that she builds up. She admires the spirit of the expressionist masters and seeks to create work that evokes an emotional impact. Her subjects include abstract landscapes and interior-scapes, as well as figurative imagery.

Christy Kinard

The work of Atlanta artist Christy Kinard is an expression of her soul, selflessly sharing her unique vision in spirited works that evoke a refreshingly youthful sense of hope, happiness, and joy. Christy Kinard has enjoyed a life-long success both as a nationally acclaimed artist and household favorite. Kinard showed her first pieces by age 18, and has been celebrated in major publications. She has continued to be popular with collectors across the United States and Europe.

John Schuyler

John Schuyler was born in Long Island, NY in 1965. After early success as a business entrepreneur, Schuyler looked toward Europe for inspiration. He found it in the Old World art technique of fresco and in the colors, smells, and textures of the Tuscan countryside. Schuyler began experimenting with fresco techniques when he returned to the United State. As he explored the possibilities of fresco, Schuyler became absorbed in the coarseness created by different applications of the plaster to his canvas. Thus, he is able to produce very rich and dynamic textures. Looking at any of his pieces, you are given to a sudden urge to run a hand over the surface of his paintings. As Schuyler's captivation with texture progressed, the content and form of his paintings became simpler. Color, studies replaced traditional forms of content in his pieces, and the balance and contrast of color became the second focal point of Schuyler's paintings. He infuses pigment into wet plaster so that color becomes part of the texture, rather than being applied to it. Schuyler strenuously scrapes acrylic paint and pigmented plaster from the surface of the linen in a style known as scraffito. This technique produces very deep and luminescent colors that heighten the effect of Schuyler's composition. Warm, earthy tones dominate his most recent work, the Paesaggio series, a reflection of his memories of a Tuscan summer. Schuyler's unconventional approach to fresco culminates in paintings that leave a powerful impression on the viewer. His rough texture alludes to a passionate physicality while its simplicity in form reflects a cool logic, a balance inherent in all his pieces.

Johnny Taylor

Based on the ephemera of modern urban life, my paintings explore the things we look at each day without seeing. Though everything is game imagery-wise, I am drawn to advertising images and glyphs, the visual shorthand of contemporary culture. As a painter, I have as an objective to explore the subtexts and uncover the possibilities of seemingly innocuous marketing imagery. The chief ambition of art, I believe, is to change the way we look at the world around us. Bright colored blocks compose my acrylic paintings. I enjoy the look and feel of loose, graffiti-like marks, text, and “noise” against these vividly hued planes. Usually I paint with layers, with each new layer showing a bit of the one beneath, either by transparency, an unpainted “window” area, or by a scraping away of recent layers. Often this process yields unexpected colors and forms. Similarly, I use corrugated cardboard, bubble wrap or other common materials to apply paint in tightly striped registers, creating texture, space, and still more unintended forms. Played against this pictorial depth are images that are hard edged and, at times, almost aggressively flat. A vibrant tension is produced by the interplay between these forthright, graphic forms and the painterly, almost old world concern for surface qualities